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Is 3DTV really the future?

posted by Evelina

Over the last couple of years 3D screenings have become common in our local cinemas, dubbed as the ‘only way’ to watch special effects filled blockbusters such as Avatar and Toy Story 3.
But we all know the downfall of 3D films: the glasses! They are simply not a good look (especially on a first date), and not only are they daft looking but they’re pretty irritating and particularly uncomfortable for anyone who has to wear genuine specs underneath. No wonder they are the most complained about aspect of 3D technology.

So are we really excited about the idea of 3DTV in our own homes? Uncomfortable and awkward aren’t two things which spring to mind as we imagine settling down on the sofa to watch our favourite movie.

So could there be a solution?

Tokyo-based tech giant Toshiba has unveiled the world’s first high definition 3DTV that doesn’t require glasses. Toshiba has designed a new range of TV’s with a ‘perpendicular lenticular sheet’, directing light from the screen to nine points in front of the TV, allowing the viewer to experience 3D images without wearing the unpopular glasses. But there is a problem, being that the viewer has to be sitting within the ‘optimal viewing zone’ in order to see the 3D images; unfortunately this zone happens to be roughly two feet away from the screen!

Toshiba will only be offering two screen sizes (12 and 20 inches) when it goes on sale in December this year, as the technology is not advanced enough to be used on larger screens. The smaller of the two will be retailing for around £910, and in order to experience the 3D images, the viewer needs to be sitting approximately 65cm from the screen. The larger screen is expected to cost around double the price, and only allows viewers to sit about 90cm from the rather small screen.

So it seems we may have been teased with the idea of non-speccy 3DTV, as we are simply replacing one form of discomfort with another. We might look slightly better, but being squashed up against a tiny screen might somewhat ruin the atmosphere as we crowd around to watch the next big match. So unless we are willing to run the risk of getting very square eyes, we may have to wait a little longer for the ultimate, comfortable home 3D experience that we are all longing for.

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